Justia U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals Opinion Summaries

Articles Posted in Health Law
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Concerned by Plaintiff’s “increasingly threatening” Facebook posts, two Marine veterans who had served with Plaintiff contacted the FBI. After interviewing Plaintiff, two FBI agents consulted with Michael Campbell, a local mental health evaluator, as to whether they should detain Plaintiff for a mental health evaluation. Campbell recommended that Plaintiff be detained. After interviewing Plaintiff, Campbell petitioned for and received a temporary detention order from a magistrate judge. Plaintiff was taken to a hospital, where he was involuntarily admitted for treatment for seven days. Following his release, Plaintiff filed suit under 42 U.S.C. 1983, seeking damages and injunctive relief against Campbell for violating his Fourth Amendment and First Amendment rights. The district court granted summary judgment to Campbell on the basis of qualified immunity. The Fourth Circuit affirmed, holding (1) Campbell did not violate Plaintiff’s Fourth Amendment rights based on existing precedent; (2) Plaintiff did not make out a First Amendment violation; and (3) injunctive relief was not appropriate on this record. View "Raub v. Campbell" on Justia Law

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Plaintiffs, physicians and abortion providers, filed suit challenging a North Carolina statute that requires physicians to perform an ultrasound, display the sonogram, and describe the fetus to women seeking abortions. N.C. Gen. Stat. 90-21.85(b). The court concluded that a heightened intermediate level of scrutiny in this case is consistent with Supreme Court precedent and appropriately recognizes the intersection here of regulation of speech and regulation of the medical profession in the context of an abortion procedure. The Display of Real-Time View Requirement is unconstitutional because it interferes with the physician's right to free speech beyond the extent permitted for reasonable regulation of the medical profession, while simultaneously threatening harm to the patient's psychological health, interfering with the physician's professional judgment, and compromising the doctor-patient relationship. Accordingly, the district court did not err in concluding that section 90-21.85 violates the First Amendment and in enjoining the enforcement of that provision. The court affirmed the judgment. View "Stuart v. Camnitz" on Justia Law

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Plaintiffs filed suit challenging the validity of an IRS final rule implementing the premium tax credit provision of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), 26 U.S.C. 36B. The final rule interprets the Act as authorizing the IRS to grant tax credits to individuals who purchase health insurance on both state-run insurance "Exchanges" and federally-facilitated "Exchanges" created and operated by HHS. The court found that the applicable statutory language is ambiguous and subject to multiple interpretations. Applying deference to the IRS's determination, the court upheld the rule as a permissible exercise of the agency's discretion. Accordingly, the court affirmed the judgment of the district court. View "King v. Burwell" on Justia Law

Posted in: Health Law, Tax Law
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Relator filed a qui tam action under the False Claims Act (FCA), 31 U.S.C. 3729-3733, against Omnicare, alleging that defendants violated a series of FDA safety regulations requiring that penicillin and non-penicillin drugs be packaged in complete isolation from one another. The court concluded that the public disclosure bar did not divest the district court of jurisdiction over relator's FCA claims. The court concluded that once a new drug has been approved by the FDA and thus qualified for reimbursement under the Medicare and Medicaid statutes, the submission of a reimbursement request for that drug could not constitute a "false" claim under the FCA on the sole basis that the drug had been adulterated as a result of having been processed in violation of FDA safety regulations. The court affirmed the district court's grant of Omnicare's motion to dismiss, holding that relator's complaint failed to allege that defendants made a false statement or that they acted with the necessary scienter. The court also concluded that the district court did not abuse its discretion in denying relator's request to file a third amended complaint. View "United States ex rel. Rostholder v. Omnicare, Inc." on Justia Law

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Plaintiffs, out-of-state medical providers seeking to open facilities in Virginia, filed suit challenging Virginia's certificate-of-need requirement. In order to launch a medical enterprise in the state of Virginia, a firm was required to obtain a certificate of public need. Plaintiffs alleged, among other things, that Virginia's requirement violated the dormant Commerce Clause by discriminating in both purpose and effect. The district court dismissed the suit for failure to state a claim upon which relief could be granted. The court concluded that plaintiffs' Commerce Clause challenges required closer scrutiny and further proceedings before the district court. The court concluded, however, that plaintiffs' Fourteenth Amendment claims were properly dismissed. Accordingly, the court affirmed in part, reversed in part, and remanded for further proceedings. View "Colon Health Centers v. Hazel" on Justia Law

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Defendant, an interventional cardiologist, appealed his conviction and sentence for health care fraud and making false statements in connection with the delivery of or payment for health care services. The convictions arose from a scheme to defraud insurers by submitting claims for medically unnecessary coronary stent procedures. The court found that, although proof of a physician's failure to meet medical standards, by itself, could not sustain a conviction for the federal offense of health care fraud, the evidence was sufficient in this case to support the jury's verdict. The court found no reversible error in defendant's remaining arguments and affirmed the judgment. View "United States v. McLean" on Justia Law

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Plaintiffs, thirteenth North Carolina residents who lost access to in-home personal care services (PCS) due to a statutory change, brought suit challenging the new PCS program. The district court granted plaintiffs' motions for a preliminary injunction and class certification. Defendants appealed, raising several points of error. The court agreed with the district court's conclusion that a preliminary injunction was appropriate in this case. The court held, however, that the district court's order failed to comply with Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 65 because it lacked specificity and because the district court neglected to address the issue of security. Accordingly, the court remanded the case. View "Pashby v. Delia" on Justia Law

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Plaintiffs-Appellees Wheeling Hospital and Belmont Hospital along with other medical providers, filed this putative class action in West Virginia state court against the Ohio Valley Health Services and Education Corporation, Ohio Valley Medical Center and East Ohio Regional Hospital, (collectively, the "OV Health System Parties"), and Appellant The Health Plan of the Upper Ohio Valley, Inc. The plaintiffs sued in order to collect amounts allegedly owed to them by employee benefit plans established by the OV Health System Parties, for which The Health Plan acted as administrator. After pretrial activity, The Health Plan moved to dismiss the claims brought against it by the hospital plaintiffs pursuant to an arbitration agreement between the parties. The district court denied this motion, holding that The Health Plan had defaulted on its right to arbitrate. The Health Plan appealed. Upon review, the Fourth Circuit concluded that the district court erred in its determination that The Health Plan defaulted on its right to arbitrate. The Court therefore reversed the district court’s denial of The Health Plan’s motion to dismiss. View "Wheeling Hospital, Inc. v. Health Plan of the Upper Ohio Valley, Inc. " on Justia Law

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Plaintiff, the Chapter 7 trustee for the bankruptcy estate of BioniCare Medical Technologies, contested determinations of the Medicare Appeals Council (MAC) refusing to provide coverage for the BIO-1000, a device to treat osteoarthritis of the knee. Plaintiff alleged that the Secretary improperly used the adjudicative process to create a policy of denying coverage for the BIO-1000, that the MAC's decisions were not supported by substantial evidence, and that the MAC's decisions were arbitrary and capricious on account of a variety of procedural errors. The court rejected those contentions and affirmed the judgment of the district court. View "Almy v. Sebelius" on Justia Law

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This appeal arose from the district court's order granting final judgment to the United States upon equitable claims of payment by mistake of fact and unjust enrichment against Tuomey arising out of alleged violations of the Social Security Act, 42 U.S.C. 1395nn, (the Stark Law), and awarding damages plus pre- and post-judgment interest. Because the court concluded that the district court's judgment violated Tuomey's Seventh Amendment right to a jury trial, the court vacated the judgment and remanded for further proceedings. Because the court was remanding the case, the court also addressed other issues raised on appeal that were likely to recur upon retrial. View "Drakeford v. Tuomey Healthcare System" on Justia Law